Wintering

If wintering is a verb then we all need to learn to winter – to rest and recharge, especially in difficult times.  Wintering can be a season to survive, a respite from the busyness of the rest of the year, or a state of mind such as a feeling sad or depressed. 

Winter is often a time for retreat – never more so than this year.  Usually I don’t mind the month of January, and enjoy the excuse to stay home when the weather turns nasty, but this year it just seems like more of the same.  So it was with interest that I saw a review on someone’s blog of a non-fiction book called Wintering, by Katherine May.   As I sometimes enjoy a light philosophical read, I ordered it from the library, but found it so interesting and well written that it might go on my purchase list.  (I usually only buy books I intend to re-read.)

The crazy quilt behind the book is perfect for winter slumbering

Here’s the Publishers Blurb:  Sometimes you slip through the cracks: unforeseen circumstances like an abrupt illness, the death of a loved one, a break-up, or a job loss can derail a life. These periods of dislocation can be lonely and unexpected. For May, her husband fell ill, her son stopped attending school, and her own medical issues led her to leave a demanding job. Wintering explores how she not only endured this painful time, but embraced the singular opportunities it offered.

A moving personal narrative shot through with lessons from literature, mythology, and the natural world, May’s story offers instruction on the transformative power of rest and retreat. Illumination emerges from many sources: solstice celebrations and dormice hibernation, C.S. Lewis and Sylvia Plath, swimming in icy waters and sailing arctic seas.

Ultimately Wintering invites us to change how we relate to our own fallow times. May models an active acceptance of sadness and finds nourishment in deep retreat, joy in the hushed beauty of winter, and encouragement in understanding life as cyclical, not linear. A secular mystic, May forms a guiding philosophy for transforming the hardships that arise before the ushering in of a new season.

About the Author:

Katherine May is a freelance writer of both fiction and nonfiction, and previous creative writing teacher.  Her journalism and essays have appeared in a number of publications, including The Times, Good Housekeeping and Cosmopolitan.  In the book she reveals she has Asperger’s Syndrome.  “I learned to winter young. As one of the many girls of my age whose autism went undiagnosed, I spent a childhood permanently out in the cold.” (page 11)

Discussion: 

As we’ve just passed the winter solstice, this is a book to curl up with and enjoy in the deep dark depths of January.

The book is a series of personal essays, divided into chapters, from September to March, with further sub-titles such as Slumber, Light, Midwinter, Snow, Cold Water, and Thaw.

I especially enjoyed the chapters on hibernation, (who knew dormice and bees could be so interesting), slumber (isn’t it always easier to sleep in the winter), and light (seeking out the northern lights in Norway).  As the author lives by the sea in England, and has not experienced the full force of a brutal snow-filled winter, she journeyed north to seek the cold and snow and to view the Northern Lights.         

Northern Lights over the Farm

She also visited Stonehenge during the Winter Solstice. There’s a chapter on light (the festival of St. Lucia), on cold water (taking the polar bear plunge) and snow (winter walks in nature are much easier on a British beach than trudging through snowdrifts).

Our beach in winter (December) before the snow.

Here’s a Goodreads link to some quotes from the book for a sample of her writing. The prose is so lovely, I would recommend it for that reason alone, even if you weren’t interested in the topic.   No wonder Elizabeth Gilbert praised it as “a truly beautiful book.”

She also mentions a poem by Syliva Path titled “Wintering” which I was not familiar with, but I imagine inspired the title of the book.   

It’s difficult to sum up what this book is actually about, it’s not advice, or self-help, but more meditative reflections on a season we all must go through. 

Winter! Bah Humbug!

63 thoughts on “Wintering

  1. DM says:

    First of all, I love crazy quilts! There is something about hand made quilts in general that I’m drawn to. Secondly, it sounds like a book I would immerse myself into. Wishing you well from Iowa! DM

    Liked by 2 people

    • Joni says:

      My crazy quilt has an interesting history. My neighbour is very into quilting and belongs to a quilting group. They were donated a half-finished quilt (the top was done) by the family of a woman who had passed away, so they decided to finish it and sell it. I loved it and bought it from them for $50, what it cost them to put the backing on and finish off. It’s so warm and cozy it’s like sleeping under one of those weighted blankets. I like to think that quilter would be happy that someone finished and is enjoying her last quilt. Hope you don’t have too much snow in Iowa….we have been okay here but then I live in the “banana belt” of Ontario!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Thanks Annie! Yes, I saw on the news this morning that the northeast was expecting a big snowstorm. We’ve been lucky and escaped that so far….it hasn’t been a bad winter at all….it’s very cold but we’re not going out much anyway the COVID stats are so bad here….that will be next weeks blog topic….another COVID winter!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. www.rosesintherainmemoir.wordpress.com says:

    American “snowbirds” from the northeastern corner tend to “winter” in Florida while Northwesterners winter in Arizona. Sometimes I’ll overhear someone asking another, “where are you wintering this year?” As for me, I winter right here where I live — in Washington state. There’s your verb “winter.”

    And, yes, we’ve been rather buried under a good foot of snow with quiet snowfalls on Monday and Wednesday, with a predicted more coming. I don’t mind. I don’t have to go anywhere. We are well stocked with food and other supplies, and the house is warm, insulated under all that snow. Right now, I think I’ll go work up a small batch of onion/potato soup with pieces of bacon for a late lunch.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      That sounds like a good wintering menu! We haven’t had a really big snowstorm yet, nothing worth shoveling so far here. Re wintering, I had not heard the expression used in that context, but it fits!

      Like

  3. Dave says:

    Your first couple of paragraphs reminded me of the Christmastime hymn, “In the Bleak Midwinter”. It’s often overlooked beside the more popular hymns, but its verses move from bleak to hopeful (perhaps like this book). “Wintering” doesn’t sound like my kind of read, Joni, but you’ve convinced me to give it a try, if only for the writing itself. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      You might order it from the library then?? She suffers from depression, although she doesn’t dwell on it, so I didn’t find it a depressing book – more philosophical than anything.

      Like

  4. Eilene Lyon says:

    Your snowman doesn’t really seem like the Grinch or Scrooge type. 😊

    We don’t seem to hibernate here, especially if conditions are good to go skiing. Mostly I’m too busy with work and such. It does sound nice, though.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Linda Schaub says:

    Winter is a good time to hibernate Joni. I’m missing my daily jaunts as the days seem to just run together, though I have been going downstairs to ride my bike before heading out to run the car and picking my way around the ice-covered sidewalk. Nothing to get too excited about. I am more concerned with getting to the Park to feed the critters who I’ve spoiled since 2013 and not been there for a week now. I will make up my miles through the course of the year (hopefully anyway). The snowman is cute including his big scarf. I always like your book recommendations – this one sounds interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      Hopefully the squirrels will be hibernating too, but I’m sure they miss you! It was too cold to walk today (minus 7) but I forced myself to go around the block for 15 minutes, then treated myself to hot chocolate!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I finally got out today – our street was still icy for some reason, so I never strayed past it, but then today, the next street over was snow and ice free. They even plowed and salted at the Park which was nice. We have freezing rain tonight which will continue through 4:00 a.m. It may get up to 37 but I’m not sure I’d walk. I did have some fans at the Park when I arrived! You have the nice hot chocolate – that is something nice to look forward too. I shut down the computer last night and remembered I wanted to comment on your mom’s painting of the northern lights. It was very nice. At first I thought it might be a photo from the book, but then realized it must be one of your mom’s.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Thanks Linda for the comment on the Northern Lights painting. You’re the first one to notice it. I should have put that it was one of hers in the caption. She has 3 or 4 versions of the Northern Lights but this is the one she usually shows. It’s supposed to be 37 here today too, but I want to write for a bit. The sky looked really stormy grey this morning but I think it has blown over. Happy to hear your fan club reappeared! I did get your message re ATG&Small, on tonight at 9pm. Although I did not get an email from Masterpiece even though I signed up again.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I felt badly I forgot to mention it the first time Joni when I noticed it. I like your mom’s paintings. I keep forgetting to ask you if I mentioned that there are teachers that conduct painting classes certified by the Bob Ross organization (hope organization is the word) and you can sign up and start/finish the painting during the class. I saw it advertised at one of the Metroparks one time. It would be fun, but I think it cost $125.00 and you had to buy/bring your own supplies!
        I did my post for tomorrow this morning … I wrote it yesterday but had to add all the pictures and I know it is a long post but includes three different places all within a few miles. I finished the post, then it was 37 degrees, so I went out. The wind had dried most of the streets and sidewalks, but I kept testing the wet spots to see if it was black ice. It was okay at the Park too, including another welcoming committee, BUT … the wind picked up a lot more and by the time I got home, I went to run the car, put on the news while in the car and the winds were 24 mph. It was actually buffeting me but had it been that windy when I started out, I wouldn’t have gone. I’ll send you each of Masterpiece e-mails til they finally put you back on. It is like Susan Branch – you were getting e-mails, I was not, though I got one this week, but not looked at it yet. The day was over too quickly due to going mid-day … disjointed. I need to get it queued up by 8:55 and I want to watch the recap that was in the e-mail … will be more behind in Reader. My basement tap handle broke in two – it is clear plastic … annoyed. I had the water dripping for two nights and I went to shut it off during the day and handle broke. So it is the hot water and small drips so I’ll deal with it as I often leave it dripping overnight as it’s cold in the basement in the laundry room. The plumber could come in and just stay downstairs, but I don’t want anyone in the house right now due to COVID. I’ll live with it – the first calamity of 2022, except I mailed my check from work for deposit as I’ve been doing since 2011 and it seems to be lost in the mail as it’s been a week.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I should have walked earlier too, as it was warmer, but by the time I went out around 3 it was really cold again. We certainly have had our share of winds this winter. Watched ATG&S tonight – it was okay. Also watched the first episode of Grantchester at PBS at 7pm and I liked it so I may go back and watch the first 3 seasons. I have Season 4 out now, but they changed the lead actor in it last year in Season 5. We tried Mad Men, but after the first episode decided that was enough – I can see that it would be enjoyable and interesting because of the story line, but I found the main character so unlikeable and his bed-hopping so bad when he had a lovely wife and kids at home. Mom didn’t like it at all, but then New York in the 50-60’s was much different than what she remembers. I have some things needing fixing too, but also don’t want anyone in the house either, so we’ll wait. The light in the oven is out, but I can’t disconnect it, so if I burn the supper then at least I have an excuse!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        This season of ACG&S is only six episodes and a special episode in October. They could lose Tristan in my opinion. When I was young, there was an elderly woman in the neighborhood who had a canary named Chadsworth. That woman had to go out of town and a neighbor was taking care of Chadsworth who died the first day the owner was gone and the neighbor was beside herself and bought a new bird to put in the cage. So that story brought back some memories. As to Mad Men, I can see how your mom wouldn’t like it – my mom wouldn’t have care for it either and I’d tell her stories about the office when I worked at Young & Rubicam and she said it was not her idea of an office atmosphere. She had worked as a bookkeper in an office environment before having me, so the early to mid-50s (she worked until a few days before she had me by C-section). I worked in the Creative Department … anything goes there, compared to other departments. Yes, Don Draper was bedhopping with so many women in the 7-year run, I lost track, but I’m sorry you will miss the episodes dealing with major news events you would remember, plus the vintage clothing/decor/commercials, etc. Yes, we’ll both deal with the minor issues because it’s too risky, though with the plumber he will just go downstairs and they bill later. I am still annoyed, but it could be worse. I need to go down and run some laundry now to warm the pipes. It is going to between -5 and -15 tonight. It is cold in the house and I put the thermostat up to 74 – I usually have it at 72, but put it to 73 and was still cold.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I did enjoy the fashion, and I’m sure I would have liked the current events, but maybe I’ll give it a try other time. I wondered about your job there? Although it was the 80’s things were still kind of sexist then, maybe not so much in my hospital field, as it was predominantly female, but still there were guys you were warned about to watch out for. Someone blogged about that old ad for Haines nylons – Gentlemen prefer Haines – a lot of that ad stuff certainly wouldn’t fly today! I find the more I put the heat up, the dryer it is in here, but at least we’re not having a ton of snow.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Don Draper seemed to have at least one fling per episode, but there were some very powerful episodes dealing with how he/Betty (his wife) really loved each other and when he was growing up and became a man after going off to war. I won’t spoil that for you in case you return to it. I did enjoy it for the drama and the acting, but yes, the Creative Department was just like that, very sexist. This series started I believe in 1959 and I worked in an ad agency beginning in 1978, so a later era, but yes, the women were treated like objects for the most part. It was definitely a man’s world. Peggy, Don’s secretary, had such a big role on the show, in a world where men were the stars, women were treated like second-class citizens … the writer of “Mad Men” was the same as “The Sopranos” (which I never saw). There is a site on Facebook about vintage advertising. I found it once when I wrote a post a few years ago, upon learning of the death of a writer I worked for at Young & Rubicam. He was my mentor and had tried to help me up the ladder to a junior copywriter position. I looked him up to show him my blog as he really wanted me to go into a writing job and was not happy with me when he left, could not take me with him and I took a job as a legal secretary. I Googled around and learned he had recently died. I sat down and wrote a post and was looking for a few of the ads he wrote as I typed the scripts for the memorable ones like with Ricardo Montalban (Corinthian leather) and Hal Linden. I wanted to include a link if I could find one. It is a fun site of old ads and advertisers would never get away with the pictures nor wording today. We are getting cold weather back the end of the week unfortunately – colder than the other day they say. But no snow – that makes me happy.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Did you post the blog about your old mentor who died? I think he was right – you would have been great if you had continued in the advertising world, or any other kind of writing job as you’re so endlessly creative. How did you get the job? I recognized Peggy from the Handmaid’s Tale, although I never watched it as I hated the book and the whole idea of it. No snow here either, and it was milder today so a good walking day….didn’t freeze my face off for a change. Have to proofread tomorrow’s blog, and it’s already past 11.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Thank you for saying that Joni – on days when I am numb at the end of the day from doing often mindless things, at least my labor-of-love blog makes me feel like I got to do something to do with my schooling as well as something I enjoy. I was a secretary in the Creative Department and applied after graduating from Wayne State with a degree in print journalism. I don’t know where I saw the ad as the university did NOT help place their graduates and because so many students had gone into investigative reporting, the market was flooded and I was placed in a P.R. firm to do my internship. I wrote paragraphs (they called them “shorts”) about why Detroit was great and we submitted them to the City of Detroit for their wire service. It did not serve as a springboard to get a job though. But my boss said he would help me and first off suggested I volunteer to do the Company newsletter, which I did as I was on the student newspaper at the community college I went before Wayne State. He gave me suggestions … we published one or two, then he left. I found out he died and the next day I didn’t walk, but sat right down and did a long post about him. Then I Googled Larry Carroll, (Jerry’s art director for years) and found him and wrote him an e-mail (on a “contact me”) and asked if he knew Jerry had died. Larry had left Michigan, moved to California and had a production company, taught at University of Berkley and was an artist. We e-mailed back and forth and I looked at the gallery of his paintings and asked if I could use one for a Veteran’s Day post. Some paintings were abstract, but I liked that one. So, when I was ready to use the painting, I couldn’t my notes on the website for the paintings, so I Googled Larry Carroll and learned he had passed away suddenly. I didn’t walk today – it was in the 30s, but black ice on the sidewalk when I went out and the traffic reporter said there were many accidents, so I was not surprised.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        It seems like you had good mentors, generous with their time and encouragement! Too bad they are both gone. I said it, because it’s true! I will respond to your gmail tomorrow, as I intend to go to bed on time tonight (last night it was 2 as I worked on todays blog!), but I deliberately said what I said!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Thank you again Joni – you don’t have to respond to the long one … I was responding to your message. I sent you a short message today … you will be shaking your head. I intended to use pictures I had already sorted and had the drafts done of the walks which I often do the day I walk, BUT I complicated my life, by going and taking more photos, so this morning before I walked, I sorted them out. They are kind of timely as they’re about Winter, then I’ll return to the three November walks. I can lose track of time when I am writing and getting a post done too … you know how long it takes to get the pictures ready and the narrative as well. I always think that takes the longest, then put it together, proof again. I went to bed at midnight last night and was mad as I’ve now broken all my NY’s resolutions except making time for TV and only did the hour last Sunday for ACG&S. Ad agency people move around a lot, but had we not lost the Chrysler/Plymouth account, I often wonder how my life would have turned out.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I did get your email and I am shaking my head, but not totally surprised. Don’t forget to watch ACG&S tonight! I’m also into old episodes of Grantchester which comes on at 7pm – last week they started in at season 1, and I had watched season 5 a year ago and enjoyed it. Around the World is on at 8 – so I guess Sunday night is TV night on PBS!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, I figured you’d shake your head and not be surprised either. I am amazed just how many shows are on PBS and I heard American and Canadian Netflix is going up slightly. Heard it on the news yesterday. I am looking forward to watching it tonight – have my link handy to get it queued up. I originally didn’t intend to go out and take more pictures this weekend because it was so cold, but I needed to give the car a run. Now I did that two days in a row (just photos yesterday though) and now with another cold spell looming toward the end of the week, I think I may have to break down and get more gas. I’ve run the car longer than usual with all these cold spells. I hate the idea of going to the gas station. They said Omicron will peak here the end of January/early February, but it may be snowy or icy by then, so will do it next weekend I guess. I have all my pantry items/groceries, so that is my only errand.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Netflix is still cheap compared to mom’s special cable movie package which at $24 a month is a waste of money, so even if it does go up a bit, it’s still worthwhile, but I can’t say we’ve watched it that much, but partly it’s because I don’t know what to watch, as a lot of what’s good I’ve seen. ACG&S was okay last night, but I could have done without that surgical scene with the cow. And I still think the whole series is miscast, all the characters, with the possible exception of the housekeeper, and I have a hard time with her accent. That’s the difference with the other PBS series I have watched – Downtown Abbey, Doc Marten, Poldark, Grantchester – the casting is excellent and it makes the characters more believable. The girlfriend is so short, they just looked awkward dancing together, plus she seems way too old for the role. We did not get even a flurry out of that big snowstorm that blanketed the rest of the province with 30-50 cm. Did you get any?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I like Mrs. Hall’s character too and this year she seems to have more of a role – I don’t remember her helping out in the surgeries, unless it is because they are so busy now. I forgot she had a first name, Audra I think when she told this possible suitor. I like that part. I don’t care for the Tristan character – too silly and Siegfried is too temperamental. I can’t understand them either and missed a good part of the show because of it. I like James but that Scottish accent. Helen is a little short for him … maybe his wife in real life was short? The cow surgery was unbelievable … they didn’t sterilize it, just cut through to find the wire … (and you don’t wash the coats, or maybe discard them, new or not?). We got no snow at all, but people were asking at my news station today where our snow is – I thought who wants it? He says the Great Lakes will get snow in mid-February through early March. Guess I need to get more gas before the big snows hit. I would have had more gasoline, but it’s been so cold, I ran it longer than usual and I really need to take it for a long run this weekend before the snow flies. Hate to go out and mingle while the surge is so bad though. Will be like you and go out, hurry back.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I remember the vet once putting a hole in one of my dad’s cows through it’s hide to release the gas in it’s stomach, but I can’t remember what he used. Yea, that scene shocked me too – with the cow just standing up there, and a bit of freezing to the skin, not shaved or anything And after he removed the wire, then he didn’t appear to stitch it up? Totally bizarre…and the dirty lab coats just hanging in the hallway after – don’t know if you caught that at the end? I don’t like the girlfriend at all – I don’t like any of them actually, except the housekeeper. I’m not sure why I watch it – the scenery maybe?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Oh, that must have been horrifying to see Joni. My great grandfather was not a nice man at all and all the grandchildren hated him (kind of like me and my own grandfather). Every time they went to their grandparents at the farm in Ariss (near Guelph), my mom said the kids would want to play with the chickens or go near where the pigs were … on purpose, he would make the kids stand there while he butchered a pig (after they were just nearby the pigpen), or he would go cut the chickens’ heads off on a stump for Sunday dinner. That’s wrong in my opinion. Your cow needed medical attention – that’s a different story entirely. Now, as to ACG&S …
        I enjoyed the books, but still have at least one, maybe two I’ve not read yet. And I think there was a movie years ago I liked … I don’t remember any of the characters, except James. But it’s been decades and the stories were not centered around the family as much as the various animals/farms, unless I’m mistaken. I think Tristan and Siegfried “act the fool” and I didn’t care for Mrs. Pumphrey (sp?) with her Pekinese either. I guess I like the scenery and it’s a change of pace, since I never got back into Boston Legal. I did catch the scene with the three lab coats on the hall tree and one fell on the floor – why would you hang them there? (I think I’d destroy them to be honest.) And putting the dead bird in the drawer? Only four more episodes and it’s done, then one in October they said. [I got here late – went out and got caught in the snow – it was flying fast and furiously and put down an inch from the time I got gas until I got home … had a debacle at the gas station and for me, not wanting to interact with anyone, I was mad, then driving home in the snow. Then, since my car is on a trickle charger, the snow was coming down hard and I have to dry off part of it, put the front 1/3 in the garage, dry off more, pull in more, then pull in the rest to dry it off. There is not a whole lot of room in the garage and getting the entire car dried off to hook up the trickle charge is no easy feat. Then I quit checking in in the morning at work and on weekends … stupid I ever did that, but on Saturdays I check in early a.m. to give him the bank balance … the security certificate expired on our system, after me reminding the computer guy to renew it two weeks ago and Robb said he gave him the e-mail I printed out when he was in last week. So this morning I wrote him a message and said simply ‘it expired yesterday – it expires every January 21st unless you renew it.” I came home to see he had called and when I got online later than usual – he wrote to say well he put Robb on a different way to remote in weeks ago and he’ll call to fix it. I said “you’ll call on a workday, not a weekend and I’m still using Windows 7, not the Windows 10 laptop and it’s not easy to move everything from my table to accommodate the Windows 10 laptop and I’m not acclimated to it.” This will be interesting and I have a table, but it will not be convenient to use this laptop which I have pictures and a couple of draft items, not to mention tax info and lots of other stuff on. I’m not using my own time to do this either. I’m quite fed up. And I’m five days behind here in Reader and feel discouraged by that as well. I’m going to have to catch up some, more tomorrow – not written my Monday post yet. Sorry for venting.]

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        What happened at the gas station? I go to one of those full-serve stations just so I don’t have to get out of the car and handle anything, just pay cash and go. Of course I have to drive to get there, as most of the ones here are self-serve, but it’s worth it. Your boss needs to be nicer to you – I don’t think he would be able to find anyone else who would put up with the stuff you do!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I looked around here – there is one in Allen Park and I may just go there going forward – I used full-serve until about 15 years ago when my mom and I were on a little trip up in NOrthern Michigan and there were no full-serve gas stations and I didn’t know how to pump and had to ask someone. When I got home, I asked my neighbor Marge the next time she needed gas to take me with her. This is something new that is happening more and more as there are less cars and more trucks and SUVs on the road … people have bigger tanks and they jiggle the handle a certain way so they don’t have to stand and hold the handle so I was frustrated yesterday. It’s not the first time, but I switched pumps and asked a total of four people (after the first rude woman). I am going to look into it in the nicer weather when I drive more – not much driving until I get the tire monitor fixed … annoyed with that happening yesterday as well. I am so frustrated with everything and I’m behind here and will dedicate four hours before stopping to see ACG&S – maybe I can finish?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I recognized the actress from Downton Abbey – so was the lady who played Mrs. Pumfrey. I find a lot of the popular British actors show up in more than one series – it must be a smaller acting world there.

        Like

      • Joni says:

        I’m behind in Reader too, and didn’t even post this week – trying to get my project finished, although I had a post drafted on books, I didn’t have time to edit it. Next week I’m just going to do a WW on puzzles.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I got two posts out of yesterday’s trip, as cold as it was. I didn’t look at the pictures yet … next week. Then it is my blogiversary and Valentine’s Day, so the week of February 21st I’ll return to pics/posts (already drafted the day I went on them) and maybe finally get to the Ford Estate before Spring. I didn’t count on taking the snow and ice pics. The puzzles will be a nice post, especially if you can use your mom’s paintings in as well.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I just went to Larry’s art site (by looking at his obituary notice) as I was going to send it to you, but they have taken it down. That’s too bad. There is another Larry Carroll artist but he had some rather outrageous looking artwork … not the same Larry Carroll. He died the same year as Jerry. I felt sick when I found that out too. They were both very nice to work with, but left together before I did after we lost our Chrysler-Plymouth account.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. indianeskitchen says:

    I can’t wait until the day comes that I can quilt again. I have enough material to probably make 50 quilts and it just sits there. The book Wintering sounds like the perfect book to read during these trying times. We haven’t had but a dusting of snow so far this winter, so strange!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      The quilting material will be waiting for you when you’re ready! It has been a strange winter weather wise so far, lots of wind but very little snow. Usually by now we’ve had a couple of snowstorms we’ve had to dig out of.

      Like

  7. throughrosetintedglasses54 says:

    That book sounds really good Joni, I will definitely look it up. I know ive had times when Ive needed to ‘winter’ but I think its not always an easy thing to allow ourselves to do as there is always that fear of being alone for long periods and the pressure from the outside world that busyness is the way forward. I think im definitely learning though that if my body and mind are telling me to rest then thats what I am going to do!

    Liked by 1 person

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