How to Hygge at Home

Usually I don’t mind January even if it is cold, dark and dreary. It’s a quiet month, a welcome respite after the rush of the holidays and a perfect time for quiet reflection or creative projects. But as we start year four of the COVID pandemic, (yes, hard to believe), along with flu, RSV and those nasty Christmas colds still circulating – well, it’s hard not to resent being stuck inside once again. For some inspiration on how to turn a bad attitude into gratitude (so cozy to be cocooning among the comforts of home), I turned to Danish author, Meik Viking’s latest addition to his growing list of hygge/happiness books.

Because the world needs more hygge!

Here’s the publishers blurb:

The author of the New York Times bestseller The Little Book of Hygge, helps you turn your home into your happy, cozy safe place.

The urge to nest and control our close environments has never been stronger. We spend more time in our homes than anywhere else—but the way in which our homes impact how we feel has remained relatively unexplored until now.

Backed with Danish design principles, years of research, case studies and a sprinkle of hygge, Meik Wiking has created the ultimate guide to turning your home, office, or wherever you may be, into your happy place.

The Hygge Home will teach us all how to create a much-needed cozy safe space in our homes into which we can retreat to escape the tough things going on in the outside world. Meik will explore the size of our spaces, the way we decorate our homes, the amount of natural light coming in, how much access to green space we have and how we can extend these design principles from inside our homes to our neighbourhoods and beyond. Meik is guaranteed to help you create a home and safe space where you can both live and thrive.

Discussion:

If you have read his previous books, The Little Book of Hygge or The Little Book of Lykke, (Denmark is home to the world’s happiest people and the author is the CEO of the Happiness Institute) this is basically the same book, although much larger in dimensions (9X11) but with the same small print. There are plenty of pretty pictures of fireplaces scenes and cocoa…

….and advice about cooking and stocking your pantry. “A well stocked pantry is comforting….if there is an abundance of food, mankind would preserve it from earliest times.” Of course stockpiling provisions for the winter was always a matter of survival for our ancestors, so when my relatives reported those 10 bushels of apples on the 1861 census they were also preventing scurvy as there was no fresh fruit available at the general store. “No matter what is going on if there is something to eat at home and a well-stocked pantry, fridge or kitchen cupboard, there is a fail-safe way to hygge hunker down during events beyond our control, whether it is a blizzard or a global pandemic.”

My pantry/freezer is so well stocked that I may not have to venture out until March!

There is a section on pre-cluttering – a term I had not heard before, but he says stop and think before you buy that pancake batter dispenser. Does anyone really need a pancake batter dispenser – no but I’m tempted, it sounds like a handy thing if you make pancakes.

There are also readers stories, like the man who wrote and said what a difference lighting a candelabra at supper had made to his family’s dinner table conversation, no more teenagers shoveling food in and then disappearing back to the company of their electronic devices, plus it saves on hydro too. (This is so true, walk into any candle-lit restaurant and don’t you feel an instant sense of calm descend…..until you see the bill.)

There are anecdotes, like Cezanne designing his studio in the south of France for the best possible painting conditions, and the author’s own search for a writing room of his own. I envy him his walnut desk which he bought with his first royalty cheque. I myself would love to find “a desk that begs you to sit down and write,” although I’m usually okay once I get started.

Overall, there was less about what constitutes hygee (book one) or happiness (book two) here, and more about lighting, design, workplaces, green spaces and city planning etc – he is Danish after all and so many people have been working from home…..and hope to stay there.

I suppose if you have great literary success with a unique formula you can just keep re-inventing it and readers will continue to buy it. Although it was somewhat repetitive, I did enjoy this book because it was fun and sometimes you just need a light comforting read. Plus it made me feel better about hibernating indoors.

What else helped? (or applying the principles)

The weather has been mild and above freezing most days with little to no snow, other than that mini-blizzard at Christmas – very strange weather for January, but good for walking, if you don’t mind walking in the misty rain. It hasn’t been very hygge though – hygge requires the contrast between coming in from the bitter cold to a warm and comforting environment.

Almost a month into winter, and the most snow we’ve seen has been on my mother’s puzzle.

It was a really nice puzzle – German made, not a brand or artist I was familiar with or could credit the photo to.

I haven’t worn my down-filled parka even once as…..

the only thing chili has been in a pot.

Channeling my ancestors – freezer provisions for Superbowl Sunday.

There have been plenty of books, (reviews to follow sometime) including this one which I’m just starting. The 86 yr old Swedish author, Margareta Magnusson, wrote The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning – a bestseller several years ago, the gist of which was don’t leave a mess for your heirs to clean up. (That’s fine but how do you know when you’re going to die – you might live another ten years and wouldn’t you want your treasures around you until then? Where’s the hygge in that?) She must have decluttered the book, as it’s a very slim 130 pages, more of a memoir really than a decluttering guide, although there is an appendix chapter at the end. I seem to have zero interest in cleaning and reorganizing this January – the maids cancelled again and I just don’t care – let the dust and the glitter from the Christmas decorations reign supreme.

There was a batch of brownies – the kind with lots of icing – always comforting on a bleak winter’s day.

And if all else fails, there’s always pie…..channeling my ancestors again.

Good apple pies are a considerable part of our domestic happiness.” (Jane Austen – letter)

Happy January – from my hygge home to yours! Two more months until spring….yea…..

There is nothing like staying home for real comfort” – Jane Austen

61 thoughts on “How to Hygge at Home

  1. throughrosetintedglasses54 says:

    Oh Joni, ive just sat dow and read your post and it was so lovely and warming. I really need to get a grasp on my blog again as its faded into the background in the last year with lots going on. I love Hygge thoughts and love creating a home that is as simple and as relaxing as possible both to the home dwellers and any guest whether two legged or four. We have had a scattering of snow over the last week but no good for building snowmen or throwing snow balls and its all but disappeared now. Love your mums puzzle. x

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      Thanks for the lovely compliment Alison! I haven’t been posting much myself – too busy with other creative projects. It’s hard to find time for everything and you must be busy promoting your book. We have snow in the forecast for almost every day next week so it’s not gone for good.

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  2. Arlene Somerton Smith says:

    I haven’t read any of the books, but I find the ideas intriguing. We light a candelabra every night at dinner (I married a romantic), and it does make a difference in dinner atmosphere. I can make a recommendation for that suggestion!

    I can tell by the photo that your apple pie is delicious. I’m fussy about apple pie, and yours looks spot-on.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      That’s lovely Arlene – lucky you to have married a romantic! My apple pie is good, but the secret is to use tart spy apples (or Empires if I can’t get spies) and the right amount of sugar, so it is not too sweet. Absolutely no cornstarch or thickener….I cringe when I taste that in store pies. I do buy the premade pastry though, a No Frills generic simple ingredients brand as I don’t like lard/Crisco recipes, and I only put a top crust on now that I am watching my cholesterol. The apples bake up so juicy that no one notices the bottom crust is missing.

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  3. Deb says:

    Joni, I’ve read the first book. I was intrigued based on my Danish heritage. It was fascinating to find that what the book was describing brought back many memories of my paternal grandmother and her lifestyle. I also found I just naturally gravitate to so much of the concepts within.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. ruthsoaper says:

    I’ve got the stocked pantry and freezers, but I find that it’s a thin line between comfort and clutter and even one or two items out of place can drive me crazy. I’m trying to get the motivation to do deep cleaning and organize some things this winter so when spring/warm weather comes I can get out and enjoy it. Your apple pie looks delicious. I think pumpkin pie is on our menu for tonight. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      I agree – some people’s houses are too cluttered, if you can’t find a place to sit down without moving a pile of junk, that’s not very welcoming. I like everything in it’s place, but can tolerate dust to a degree.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Ally Bean says:

    I’m feeling warm vibes just from reading this. I knew of hygge but have never intentionally tried to create it at home. I like the simplicity of how you can go about creating this atmosphere and of course comforting food and drink help too. Winter can be a bummer, but maybe less so with hygge?

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Linda Schaub says:

    Thank you for the introduction to “hygge” Joni. Once upon a time when the house was immaculate, there were two rooms that were hygge, the TV room and the kitchen. The den was the place to go to watch TV, or read a book, or pull the afghan over you – nice and cozy. Our living room was never cozy, with its rigid furniture and cool in that room as it is next to the garage. Your food makes me think of days gone by and nice treats like apple pie and brownies that I just took for granted as they were always there – perhaps I should have savored them more and thanked the cook for slaving over a hot stove to make them. I like the puzzle – my mom would have liked that one. I saw it when looking online (I believe at “Bits and Pieces” )for a puzzle for Ann Marie. She is having a hip replacement on February 8th – in/out the same day. I’d rather get a puzzle than flowers. My mom liked FX Schmidt puzzles – we used to get them as well.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      That’s a great idea for a gift – as she will be immobile for awhile. I know they are starting to do some same day hip surgerys here too. I hope you got out for a walk today, as it’s snow tomorow and off and on all next week.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I was amazed at her coming home the same day and they put her into a smaller, satellite hospital for this surgery as the bigger hospitals have so many Covid patients and it lessens the chance that she comes home with not only a new hip prosthesis but Covid as well. I thought it was a good idea too Joni. I got her a puzzle when she had her hernia surgery and she enjoyed it and something she and her husband can do together, unlike a book. Flowers are something more to do and she will be immobile. I did walk and take the car out yesterday – I knew the snow was on the way and Wednesday we are getting 3-6 inches.
        Hope they are wrong. I tried to finish archiving my blog and some other items off my laptop – took forever. I got here too late and now it is time for ACG&S.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        ACG&S was actually really good tonight – even mom said so! But then I love horses. I knew they put the horses down at the end of WW1 rather than bring them home – as I saw the movie War Horse. I didn’t walk today – it snowed, although the road was wet I wasn’t sure how icy it was, plus I cooked a roast which seemed to take all afternoon and two loads of dishes and then it was too dark! I made cheese sauce today for over broccoli and it turned out good.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I really enjoyed ACG&S last night too Joni and misted up at the flashback part where he had to put that healthy white horse down. I remember that movie War Horse, but didn’t see it and just looked on Amazon and put it on my “Watch List” … it is $3.99 to rent, but I have a digital credit to use in the next month, so I’ll watch it one night. I had no idea they put the horses down rather than transporting them – how cruel that is. I sent you a Masterpiece e-mail earlier which you and your mom will enjoy – it’s all about last night’s episode and how they trained River and used a stunt double for Siegfried in some places, but not all. It was the first time I saw him soften up and show some emotion in last night’s show in interacting with the horse and thinking about his friend.
        I somehow missed the fact that Major was his commanding officer in WWI in Belgium. I thought he just went by the name “Major”.

        Your meals all look so good in your blog posts – wow, a roast too – you are a good cook. My mom liked roast beef and she would cook it in onion soup, so it seemed the house smelled of onion soup for days. That’s how she made her spaghetti too. She boiled the noodles in the Lipton dry onion soup mix , then added the meat and sauce. I think I can walk tomorrow as the snow was off the street and my driveway, but I’ll see how it goes in the morning – it might be icy as they didn’t salt. Likely it will be the last day for a little while with this all-day snow on Wednesday and forecasting 2-6 or 7 inches of snow.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Thanks for the gmail on the horse training – it was interesting. Yes, Sigfried seemed a bit more engaged last night. Re roast – it was tough, after all that work, and cooking it low and slow and spending $20 it shouldn’t have been. I’ve been very disappointed in my last few roasts I’ve bought, the cut they say it is on the package may not be what it is – and the butchers always are seem to be different – maybe I need to try a different grocery store. So because it wasn’t the best, today I threw the rest into a stew, which mom liked. I don’t really care for stew, as I don’t like the gravy base. What a neat idea for your mom to use the onion soup mix – that would give it more flavor. Yes, we are getting a snowstorm on Wed. into Thursday too. I see there is another shooting in California again, this time at a mushroom nursery/farm.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I always thought his character was so pompous and stuffy, but nice to see he had a softer side. Do you have butcher shops around you and can get a cut of meat you can see better or they can recommend? My mom would complain when she unpackaged a roast or other meat and find the fatty parts were hidden on the bottom of the package. Funny – my mom loved stew and I really didn’t like it at all. I never complained and ate it, but it was never my favorite. The dried onion soup in the roast and the spaghetti noodles smelled the house up, but yes, made it very tasty! And the spaghetti noodles were tinted brown. My grandmother used to save all the onion skins and boil them to dye the Easter eggs a reddish-brown color. It was gorgeous today – hated to come home. I walked to/from the Park – I didn’t want salt on the car, since it likely will sit for a long time now; they are now predicting a 6-8-inch snowfall for us and my weather radio went off that it had turned into a Winter storm watch from a Winter storm warning. Dreading it … supposed to be quite a heavy and wet snow.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Our local grocery store has a butcher shop, and so does the Metro store, as you can see them working/packaging stuff, but there’s only one butcher I trust, and I haven’t seen him there lately. We used to have our own meat on the farm – my mom had an enormous freezer which took up one whole wall of the kitchen – and I always thought a sirloin roast was one of the better cuts, but I might be buying them too lean, so then it’s tougher. I froze the rest of the stew today as even mom didn’t want it. I’m not really a great cook, but am improving, due to lots of practice. Today was gorgeous and sunny, so I walked extra, as not likely I will get out again for a few days.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        When my mom quit going grocery shopping and I did all the grocery shopping, she still would venture out occasionally to go “meat shopping” – we had a local meat market who was known for their honesty and good cuts of meat – they never hid the fat or big bone on the bottom. Mom would send me there for soup bones when she mad her Winter soups and they were an Italian market so she made a sausage and potato soup with mild and spicy sausage, so went there for sausage. I hope I’ll learn how to cook when I am retired … I am glad I bought the crockpot though. Yes, yesterday was gorgeous and sunny and I hated to come home. We are having snow every day through Sunday and an Alberta Clipper on Saturday which they say will make it very cold next week.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I’m going to make cauliflower cheese soup today with the rest of the cauliflower. I’ve never made it before, so will have to google for a recipe first. I’ve gotten to the point where I hate eating canned soup (except for tomato) as it all tastes so salty to me. I never cooked much before I retired either, and I can’t say I enjoy it, but I like to eat!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Cauliflower cheese soup sounds good – my mom used to make a broccoli cheese soup sometimes. Not as large of a soup pot as the others, just enough for a few nights. We had some large Rubbermaid containers, so we could freeze the soup to have a few weeks or even a month later. The good ol’ days and homemade soup. Hope it turned out okay.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        It was good for a first attempt, probably very similar to your broccoli cheese soup. But I decided to freeze some, even before I read your post,, as it was very rich from the cheese, and I’m trying to watch my cholesterol/fat intake. I had a very small portion. Mom liked it too. She used to freeze her cheese sauce, so I think it will freeze okay. I added some grated Parmesan cheese to give it a bit of extra sharper flavor.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        It sounds good. I bought those cookbooks for crockpot cooking and they have some soups in them, so I look forward to trying some out when I have more time and can experiment more. I have to expand my horizons too!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I went through a crockpot phase, but found it annoying smelling the food all day and by the time it was ready I was beyond hungry. Plus I wasn’t happy with the recipes I tried, well not enough to repeat them. I made my soup in a pot on the stove yesterday, or in one of those cast iron pots where you don’t have to watch it as closely. Have you had good luck with the recipes. I must have made 7 different soups in that InstaPot Cooker and they all lacked flavor, but that is pressure cooking. I was never brave enough to leave the crock pot on all day if I wasn’t home so I only used it on my days off.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I actually only have the crockpot on for two or two and one-half hours which is not too bad. There is no hood over the stove and when my mom made stews and soups, the house would smell as it was cooking for hours, especially that spaghetti or roast that was in the dried onion soup. I just leafed through those cookbooks when I ordered them and put them away. There are some desserts like cobbler and pizza too. I ordered them as they were all spiral-bound and there were not a lot of copies and spiral-bound is easier to leave open etc. I did the same thing for some art-how-to books I ordered in the Spring as they were spiral-bound and limited copies. Got everything for retirement … just need to be retired. I didn’t know you had an InstaPot Cooker. I would worry about a pressure cooker in case something went wrong with it and the lid flew off. I had a boiled egg gizmo that you filled with water and placed four eggs in it and I forgot how long you put them in the microwave for, but they came out perfectly. We made them for soft-boiled eggs and hard-boiled eggs too. But one time, I didn’t have the lid on tightly and it exploded in the microwave – big mess. But, it was a great device. I would never leave the crockpot on all day and be out of the house. I won’t even put it on and go on a walk. I will go outside to run the car or shovel snow, but that’s it and it shuts itself off and goes to “warm”.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        It must be because it is small perhaps? This is actually a bigger crockpot than what I would need, but I decided to get it after Diane (In Diane’s Kitchen) had a crockpot recipe that looked good. I said I had been thinking of getting one. She suggested this model (will put it in a separate comment in case it goes to SPAM although I see on Amazon it is out of stock – when I ordered it, it was on back order too). Diane’s mother-in-law lives alone and Diane suggested it for her as it has three different inserts, one is divided. Plus it is programmable. I’ve only used the one insert so far and it makes enough for leftovers for two-three days. I started reading your InstaPot post and will have to come back to it as I have to find my link for ACG&S to have it queued up. I started using a different browser this week, so I have had to do things differently for some sites. As far as I got I remembered getting the microwave and my mom reading the booklet and saying “take it back – it’s not safe!” We kept it in the basement on an old compact freezer that had broken. No room to keep it upstairs. Then two doors down, the guy put a plate in the microwave and it had gold-rimmed edges and blew the door off. My mom was adamant we should not use it but I assured her I was careful. Funny you wrote this because I saw last night I would be worried about a pressure cooker exploding. I only leave the house to run the car or shovel – nothing more. I’m like you – very cautious.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        HA! I remember making that mistake with mom’s gold rimmed china which we only used at Christmas time – instant sparking! You don’t have to read the InstaPot post – it’s way too long – I was trying to be thorough as it was geared for beginners, and I found the booklet not very helpful. The problem with it is I had the mini-one and at that time there wasn’t a cookbook for the mini-size and all the recipes on line were for the larger InstaPots. I have since bought a cookbook but nothing in it looked that appealing. I don’t eat a lot of spicy food, and the regular stuff was all so bland as if it had been boiled and was tasteless. Even for soup, you need to have it simmer for awhile to get flavour, if it cooks in ten minutes – yes it was fast, but tasetless. Some people swear by them though, although I think air fryers are more popular now. I have enough unused kitchen appliances now! ACG&S was okay tonight, not as boring as last year anyway.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        No, I didn’t forget about reading it. I went to bed a little earlier last night because it was bitter cold in the kitchen. I had raised the heat and I should have opened the cellarway door (I keep it closed all the time) – when I opened it, it got too cold in the kitchen. I am behind in my book. This dog next door is howling so loud right now, I can’t hear myself think. She left this morning at 8:00 a.m. and since I came home, it has been howling non-stop (inside … so I cannot make a stink about it). My mom once asked her if she could put shut her bedroom door (right under the kitchen window) as they whined and cried all day and she said “but my dogs like it in my room” … I know now what my mom went thru, only two whining dogs, not just one … it is a constant whine, interspersed with yappy barks. I don’t know where she goes every night – she used to be home right after work. Anyway, as to the gold-rimmed plate …

        My mom didn’t see the microwave as I took it right downstairs – no room upstairs, but SHE read the book that came with it and really didn’t want it. When the neighbor’s microwave door blew off because of the metal on the plate, she was even more worried about it. I keep reading Diane’s recipes with the air fryer and they look good – I won’t buy anything until I have time to learn and use it. The crockpot works for now and I use the BPA-free, nylon liners by Reynolds (Wrap company), so I just lift it out and throw it away and just take a papertowel for any moisture in the crock. My mom wanted to get a stand-up mixer, so I have that – I doubt I will ever use it to be honest.

        I liked ACG&S last week with the horse better – the nutty guy yelling at Jim and Tricky Woo they could have left out. So much for Mrs. Hall and Gerald’s friendship/romance and now it will be all about Tristan and Flo’s relationship. Only two more episodes left. I had hoped to start Yellowstone but now I am behind in my book.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        What book are you reading? I didn’t know they had liners for the crockpot? I could not handle a yappy barking dog. Can you wear earplugs – they never worked for me.? I think a stand-up mixer would be useful someday. I don’t have one but could have used one the other day to puree my cauliflower. I worked on a WW for tomorrow and a short recipe for next week for Valentine’s.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I am still reading “A Walk in the Woods” the book I bought after seeing the movie in December. The movie was funny but the language a little raw in places, not Robert Redford’s character Bill Bryson (the author of this book and a real-life travel writer), but the character of his friend Katz, played by Nick Nolte. I wanted to finish by January 31st, but that didn’t happen as I worked all day in the kitchen decluttering last Sunday. I’ve left work late a few days this week and I had to back outside yesterday due to ordering a new trickle charger from Amazon when the old one had copper wire exposed … noticed it yesterday morning and as soon as the new one was delivered, I went outside and fiddled with it. I’ve walked the last two days and it was a little rigorous down at the Park as it wasn’t plowed. So the car minor issue yesterday; today I got up and put the table radio on and it made a loud noise – I thought it was the station, because it wasn’t like that on other stations. So I have no clue what is wrong with the radio. Will have to see if it’s the plug and if it is I’m fresh out of outlets. I’m sitting here tonight with the cellarway door open (which I never do), hoping it would warm the kitchen and downstairs I hear intermittent beeping. I Googled the Kidde carbon monoxide detector and it said beeps every 60 seconds means end of life for it. But I wrote a post about the last carbon monoxide detector going off beeping continuously and I could not pull the battery as it was after I caught my finger in the garage door – so that was 2019. They usually last longer. So I went downstairs while the furnace was on to see if it was the furnace and it’s fine, the carbon monoxide detector is still doing its usual pulsing and level “0” … I have not got a clue. I’m expecting our City will have water main breaks with these frigid weather.

        The dog is driving me up the wall – finally the dog on the corner no longer barks, but this dog is inside the house, right under my kitchen window. They used to drive my mom crazy when she had two dogs, then they both died and she got this yappy dog, a Bichon Frise, high strung and starts when she walks out the door. I don’t like wearing earplugs as I worry they will damage my ears, so I have Kleenex in my ears and ear muffs on. I look cute sitting here. Before Summer and open windows, I will either buy noise canceling headphones and/or a white noise machine. We had white noise at the office and when I was alone in the office (frequently), the constant noise would lull me to sleep. I am four days behind in Reader and didn’t come here at all last night and went to bed instead.

        The crockpot liners are great – it is a little bigger than the biggest crock – they won’t harm you, I only buy Reynolds as they have no BPA and are nylon and will not catch fire. No mess, no fuss. I am not going to have a specific Valentine’s Day post as it will be my 10-year blogiversary which I’ve not written yet.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Will the radio need replacing? Can you buy a radio anymore? I know mom has an old one that runs on batterys in case the tv and hydro go out. If the C02 monitor beeps intermittently does it mean the batterys need replacing? Usually those Kiddie ones are good for 7 or 10 years. The fire dept. replaced mom’s last year as part of a seniors program and installed some new kind of combined fire and C02 wired into the ceiling (with a backup battery). They also put one in my house, as I was tired of it going off when the steam from the bathroom got too hot. Plus they did it for free. I didn’t even know BPA was an issue with crockpots.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I have to move the radio off the table this weekend and in this house, outlets are few and far between, so I’m not sure where I’ll put it to test it. I don’t understand why it just went like that overnight. Not gradually. Now it is on all channels. And, I learned that Bose is no longer in business. It is about 10-12 years old, but maybe it is a plug? I went back downstairs twice last night when I put laundry in to warm the pipes, but both times there is nothing wrong with the C02 detector. The smoke detector chirps. Kidde’s website says it will peep every 60 seconds for end of life, but it’s only three years old. We get free fire alarms, but not C02 alarms from the fire department. I bought a new one and a fire extinguisher last year, but have not looked at the directions for either. The smoke alarm I have is very old, but I test it and it works. I didn’t phrase that right – the BPA is not issue with the crock in the crockpot, but the plastic. It is BPA-free, so no worries about cooking your food where it might have BPA. We used Rubbermaid containers for soup for years. For other food we had microwave plates, (like pancakes), but I’m sure those containers were not BPA-free.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Here is the link to what I got – I was reluctant to spend that much money on it, but figured it will last a long time and it is a “Crock-pot” brand. I think it was $79.00 at the time I bought it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I have that one too, and also bought one for mom one Christmas, but that was about ten years ago and it didn’t have the inserts. I think ours was 6 quart and it was too big to make soup in. I think we paid about $40 at Canadian Tire on sale, but it was just a basic model. I thought the larger it was the longer it took to cook, as you had to have it 3/4 full to cook properly, so I bought a small one for $20 and it took the same amount of time. Both of ours are just sitting in the basement. The inserts would be nice though.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I bought my mom a Rival crockpot when they first came out. I was at J.C. Penney around Christmastime and they were on sale for $20.00. I brought it home and said “this will make your life so much easier Mom.” She was short, like you said you are – my mom was 5′ 2″ tall. She could not see into the crockpot as the counters are fairly high. (I never thought of them as particularly high until this happened.) She said “how can I see the progress of dinner if I can’t see inside?” She made me take it back. This one cooks fast and I just run it on low – I have always been very wary of what fire can do. My mom was worried as she was slow moving in later years. She would have been terrified the night of the fire – I am worried every high wind day that another branch will fall on the electrical wire.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Wow, your counters must be high! When my neighbours tree fell on the house next door, it was years before I could sleep again during a wind storm. I used to go down to the couch feeling it was safer than upstairs near the roof! Signing off now – go and read your book!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        See, to me they don’t seem high and when my mom (5′ 2″) couldn’t see inside the pot, I was just amazed. It would make my day (if not year) if they take that tree down. It will cost a pretty penny to take it down and it is two yards away and the branches stretch that far. I don’t blame you for worrying … trees do a lot of damage here in some neighborhoods. In Oakland County, not close to me, maybe 25 miles away, there are a lot of stately homes in old, tree-lined neighborhoods. Same where my boss lives. They are always losing power from fallen trees in these two areas. I am going to finish that book this weekend. I had thought about going to a Winter Festival, but before the crowd to see the ice sculpture, but it would be 7 above air temps, 7 below wind chill. That’s too cold for the camera and fingers!

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Dave says:

    I need to read my copy of the “Little Book” again, and maybe even purchase this one now that we’re living in a different house. When you mentioned the candelabra at the dinner table, you said “…saves on hydro too.” Is hydro a term for electricity? I love how you Canadiens have a few words we Americans don’t (and likely vice-versa!) Makes for the occasional surprise when I read your blog.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      Yes! Ontario Hydro is our electricity/energy provider…shortened to Hydro….as in my hydro bill is way too high. I really enjoyed the Swedish Aging book – it was a fun read, but very slim, so borrow one from the library if you can. It’s $20 US/ $25 Cdn. She has a really good sense of humor, and an appealing writing style.

      Like

  8. Anne says:

    I so enjoy reading your posts, Joni! Our power was off tonight from 5 until 9.30p.m. I locked the doors and drew the curtains closed, poured a glass of wine and enjoyed the glow from our rechargeable light globes – that was Hygge alright 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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