A History Lesson – Throwback Thursday

1918 flu ladies with masks

A friend sent me this in an email so I can’t credit the source, but it’s deja vu a hundred years later.   In 1720 there was the plague, in 1820 a cholera epidemic, in 1918-20 – The Spanish Flu, and now 2020 COVID-19 Coronavirus.  It seems history repeats itself every hundred years.

Spanish flu

Spanish flu

Spanish flu

Spanish flu

17 thoughts on “A History Lesson – Throwback Thursday

  1. Anne says:

    I do not know who compiled this very appropriate composite e-mail or from what sources, but I first received it about a month ago and a few times since. The pictures and message are pertinent.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      I’m not sure it was exactly 100 years apart, I’m thinking the plague was earlier, but I guess it just means the world has survived a lot and this situation is only unique to us, but not history…..

      Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Well it gives us a history lesson when we are indeed thinking we are the only ones to weather such a storm – it looks like others had it just as tough as us. Maybe even tougher when you think of it as they don’t have the modern-day conveniences we enjoy.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I was surprised re the masks back then…I wouldn’t have thought they knew that much about how germs/viruses are transmitted, same with the social distancing. Those cities in the US who locked down have fewer deaths, even back then.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Joni – I wonder if this is where our current doctors got the idea for masking up? Our Governor extended our stay-at-home order til June 12th. Dentists and doctors are allowed to open up in a normal manner after May 29th. But a lot of places are still not open (gyms, beauty/nail salons to name a few) … still not sure I want to go to the dentist, eye doctor, or a haircut for a long time, despite my dentist promoting on its Facebook page that they are skilled in using PPE and sanitizing their offices. I was nervous enough going for my shots the other day; getting gas not so much, but shots yes. Next time, I won’t need to wear a top with sleeves or a coat, so better … still not made it to the grocery store. I intended to go yesterday, but it rained, thought about today, but the other day the Governor allowed people to gather in groups of 10, so I figured everyone will run to get more food for bigger gatherings. I’m not out of food and with all the storms coming up, probably better not to put too much in the fridge … the heat spikes and volatile weather may cause a power outage. I had a brief power outage earlier this week.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. J P says:

    Very interesting. I had known about the Spanish flu, but not the earlier epidemics. I will confess to some skepticism over things like this that cruise across social media, but I guess the only appropriate response is to read more history.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      I’m not sure the others were truly pandemics, more epidemics or diseases which were always around to some degree. I think the plaque was earlier than 1720? but I guess who ever put it together was making a point that we’ve always had diseases man couldn’t control down through the centuries….and I think we’re going to have to learn to live with this one for awhile longer. Same with childhood diseases. When I was researching genealogy, one branch of the family lost 3 of their 4 children in the same week in March 1863 – ages 5, 8 and 16 – obviously something infectious. Their tombstones are small ones in our churchyard. They moved to the US after that, probably for a fresh start, and I lost track of them after that. We have grown accustomed to science always solving everything…..

      Like

  3. annieasksyou says:

    I missed this, Joni. I love the last line of the poem—we talk about getting a fresh start in combatting climate change. Wouldn’t that be wonderful!

    Did you know that the Spanish flu originated in Kansas?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      I suspect in 1869 when the poem was written, they were worried then about the smoke and pollution from the industrial age! Yes….I read and reviewed the book on The Great Influenza back in March – about the army camps and the soldiers taking it with them on the ships to Europe during WW1.

      Like

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