Twenty Pairs of Black Pants

March Break - AMc - 2005

March Break –  2005

          March really is the cruelest month.   The daffodil stalks are peeking up optimistically through the thawing ground, but the temperature is still in the negative.   The bone-chilling cold of January has been replaced by the raw damp winds of March, interspersed with a few bright sunny days, a tease of warmer weather to come.  There is always that one last snow storm or bout of freezing rain to crush your expectations of spring, when it is a relief to wake up in your cozy bed listening to the sleet against the window and know you have no place to go.   Now that I’m retired I have more days like that, in fact I don’t even have to get dressed at all.  I can stay in my PJ’s all day if I want.   And that is the dilemma with retirement clothes.  

           Just what do you wear when you are now longer working, or maybe like Cinderella you toil at home, not necessarily scrubbing the scullery floors, but looking after wee ones or freelancing or blogging.  (Does anyone else have writing clothes?)   If you have been a career person who lived in business clothes most of your life you may find after a period of social inactivity that your wardrobe has sadly deteriorated into a sloppy mess of old sweatpants and t-shirts, with perhaps a few dressy items for going out.   Even the last few years of my working life, my wardrobe had dwindled into a collection of black pants, of which I must have at least twenty pair (there might be more I’m afraid to count), and an assortment of tops which have lived in my closets for years.   Yes, I shop in my closet.

            A recent report on the CBS (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation), said that the average Canadian buys 70 new garments per year, and we spend 400% more on clothes than in the 1980’s, all due to Fast Fashion which allows us to buy more for way less.   The report went on to describe how most of the old clothes we donate to charities end up in the landfill, either here or in African countries, as they are not needed, and urged people to hold swap meets and to buy less.  For once it seems I am ahead of the game, but not necessarily for the environmental reasons they suggested.  (see Sears RIP blog for the death of style). 

           Is it possible to look stylish and comfortable on a limited budget? Scraggly old sweats and stained t-shirts are fine for a few hours relaxing on the couch or doing laundry, cleaning or gardening but I’m not sure I want to live in them all the time.  There must be more attractive options – it’s time to hit the stores. 

             And the stores are full of black yoga pants and black leggings.  I have finally gotten used to skinny jeans but I hate yoga pants and leggings…worst thing ever invented.  All that spandex, and the material doesn’t breathe, and most of the time they are way too tight, your legs end up looking like sausages or toothpicks depending on your weight.   If they fit at the waist then they are baggy in the legs, or the legs are skin tight, and how attractive is that, unless you prefer the boots/hooker look, and really what MAW (mature adult woman), looks good in that?   Even Madonna is too old for that look although she doesn’t seem to know it, but then neither does Beyonce and she is still young.    I did manage to find a nice pair of comfortable black Puma sweatpants at Winners for $25, half price.  (When you are retired, you have to be frugal).   The material was thick too, not Lulu Lemonish, so they will be good for walking in cold weather, which is all we are having right now.    I also found a nice comfy pair at Reitman’s, under their Hyba brand, soft and minimal spandex.    Both had a drawstring waist, an important feature, if you plan on eating in them.  (When you are retired you tend to go out for lunch a lot.)   And because Reitman’s had a BOGO 50% off sale, (oh what suckers we are), I got a soft blue sweatshirt….did I mention it was soft.  Of course even the small was too big at the shoulders, but the saleslady assured me it should be worn off the shoulder with a tank top underneath, kind of like that old eighties movie, Flashdance.   I also bought some black fleecy long johns (top and bottoms) at Mark’s Work Warehouse, for $30 each….very warm and cozy, and great for winter walking.  I have worn these under my old sweatpants, and have been quite toasty even in minus thirty degree weather.  Now if they only made fleece for your face, I’m sure I would venture out more.   I also bought a pair of lined (T-Max Heat) black pants at Mark’s Work Warehouse for $40 half price, which I have worn shopping or running errands, and they are nice too, so we have the winter wear covered….oops forgot about the hat. Got a nice thick red and brown knitted hat to match my red parka, at Winners…$12.  It’s hard to find a decent hat unless you want to look like a Gap ad with a pompom on your head, maybe attractive for fifteen year old models but not MAW.  (I could do a whole separate blog on hats.)   Oh, and because it is Canada, boots are an essential item – practical boots, $62 with a $10 gift card (oh what suckers we are), at Marks Work Wearhouse 50% off sale, black suede with fur trim, mid calf, good for snowdrifts and shoveling the driveway, not so good for walking in, but they probably need to be broken in…did I mention it’s been too cold to walk lately?

         On the days when it’s so cold, you don’t even feel like getting dressed, pajamas are important, so two sets, both navy, one plain navy with white piping, (I call them my Rosemary Clooney White Christmas pajamas only hers were red), and one with a thin-striped navy top and navy bottoms, both from Winners.    I find I am spending more time sleeping, nine hours a night, (for the first time in my life people tell me I look good….what they mean is I don’t look tired), and they are both great for lounging around in the evening.  Both are very soft cotton material, although a bit warm for the winter nights when it’s minus thirty below and I have the heat cranked up so the pipes don’t freeze.  Then I wear my summer PJ’s.

             Before Sears closed I bought a navy blue with white trim (I sense a nautical theme here), designer one piece bathing suit for 60% percent off, at $25, a real bargain.   It was for those water aerobics classes at the sports complex, but I have yet to wear it.   It’s too cold to go to the arena but I’m sure my bone density test will love it someday.   My last purchase was a new rose/brown sweater, again end of season half price $42, for wearing with jeans or black pants for lunches/dinners out.     And there you have it….retirement wardrobe covered, total cost, approx. $400.    I could use a few more casual tops for the sweats, but before you know it,  spring will be here, and I can switch to t-shirts and start my annual hunt for Capri pants that fit.   Is there anything more enticing than stores full of colorful spring clothes in the last dregs of winter – such promise of summer days ahead.   Or maybe next winter, I’ll just skip the whole thing and wear that bathing suit down south. 

         I wrote this wardrobe update summary the first year of my retirement, but in the year since then I have bought even less, (three more pairs of black Hyba pants, two summer tops, and a mint green Columbia spring windbreaker jacket), so obviously I am not the typical consumer the CBS based their poll on.  It does seem excessive to buy so much, not to mention expensive.   I remember spending more money on clothes in my younger years because I loved to shop and people dressed up more back then.  (see vintage blog)   Maybe younger people are happy with the available Fast Fashion.   But I am older and fussier now too – it must be of good quality, fit well, look good, be comfortable, practical, needed, a reasonable price and also bring me joy – a tall order for any poor garment.   No wonder I am buying less.  I have been reading about all things Parisian for future blogs, and the French seem to be perfectionists when it comes to clothing, which may be why they have such great personal style.   A French woman will shop for months for the perfect article of clothing.  I think I would do well there.  Vive la France!  

(Disclaimer:  I do not own this Paris picture, it was from a box of note cards but it is so elegant I just had to share it.) 

Postscript:   The snowdrops are out, the first sign of spring. Snowdrops

13 thoughts on “Twenty Pairs of Black Pants

  1. rhc55 says:

    You have reminded me how much I love TS Eliot; I must find my old anthology and have a good read, I haven’t read ‘Prufrock’ in years. Do Canadians really buy 70 new garments a year? I don’t think I’ve ever bought that many in a year. I sympathise with the dilemma of what to wear in retirement. When I retired 21 months ago, I kept 2 suits (both skirt suits – I never wore trousers to work as when I started work women just didint; waer trousers, and somehow it stuck), my favourite beautiful tailored one for sentimental reasons and my black one for obvious reasons, the rest went to charity. I have been fortunate in being able to pass on the bulk of my surplus clothes to my two daughters, who are happy to give them a new lease of life.I agree I no longer have need of an extensive wardrobe (and mine wasn’t that extensive as I only worked three days a week) and spend most of my days in skinny jeans, T shirts/shirts and jumpers. Good blog…

    Liked by 1 person

    • thehomeplaceweb says:

      T.S.Elliot?? Sorry I am not a poetry person? The 70 new garments per year seemed excessive to me too, but then they may have based their poll on people living in Toronto working in the fashion industry! Certainly even in my prime shopping years, I might have bought one item per week, but of better quality than most of what is available now, although we do not have good shops where I live, so if I lived in a bigger city I might buy more. I never wore trousers to work either, (it was expected you dressed up) until I switched jobs in 2004 then I started wearing pants because everyone else did. I do miss wearing beautiful clothes, but it is nice to be comfortable too. I love that British term, “jumpers”!

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  2. thehomeplaceweb says:

    T.S.Elliot?? Sorry I am not a poetry person? The 70 new garments per year seemed excessive to me too, but then they may have based their poll on people living in Toronto working in the fashion industry! Certainly even in my prime shopping years, I might have bought one item per week, but of better quality than most of what is available now, although we do not have good shops where I live, so if I lived in a bigger city I might buy more. I never wore trousers to work either, (it was expected you dressed up) until I switched jobs in 2004 then I started wearing pants because everyone else did. I do miss wearing beautiful clothes, but it is nice to be comfortable too. I love that British term, “jumpers”!

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    • rhc55 says:

      I do apologise – I assumed it was a deliberate misquote of Eliot’s ‘The Waste Land’, which starts: ‘April is the cruellest month…’. I studied him at school for my ‘A’ levels (exams we take around age 18), I don’t read a lot of poetry now. What I miss about smart clothes is not the clothes, but wearing pretty heels. I have/had a bit of a shoe fettish and still have a modest collection of lovely shoes (all bought in sales), but as I dress up so rarely now it almost kills me to wear heels for more than a short while. How do you call ‘jumpers’ (which we also call sweaters, pullovers or woollies)? Thinking about it, it is a silly word and I can’t imagine where it came from.

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      • thehomeplaceweb says:

        Oh so that’s where the expression came from! I did not know, just thought it was one of those old sayings. I have a degree in science so my love of literature is not based on any formal training. Re heels yes I remember wearing heels every day at work, now it’s only flats. Jumpers are sweaters here, but I was familiar with the term as I have read a lot of Joanna Trollope/ British novels over the years, although I do not think her latest work is as good. I will have to research The Waste Land – I very vaguely remember it from high school – I did a blog recently on the Robert Frost poem Snowy Woods, and it morphed into a post on song lyrics, so you never know what might take my fancy! Thanks for explaining. (the blog is called Music and Poetry for a Snowy Day and at the end of it I describe how a lecturer tried to set a poem by Yeats to music but it did not translate to a hit song. I wonder if TS Eliott would work?!)

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  3. Chomeuse with a Chou says:

    The French where I live (not Paris admittedly) don’t mind so much about high fashion. I blend in well enough with the rest of them most of the time, and as a stay at home mum I’ve forgotten how to dress elegantly. Jeans and t-shirts rule here!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. rhc55 says:

    I have just read your excellent Music and Poetry for a Snowy Day – what a clever idea and what a lot of work you must have put into researching it. As I’m new to blogging, I haven’t read many ‘old’ posts and shall clearly have to work my way through them. For a scientist and someone who says they are not a poetry person, you have a lot of knowledge. I enjoyed reading the Robert Frost, which I don’t know. Paul Simon, of course, is a genius and ought to be in line for a Nobel Prize for Literature if Dylan can get one. I read somewhere not so long ago that the Byrons/Shelleys/Keatses etc were the rock stars of their day. Perhaps we should start reading lyrics without the music (selectively) fully to appreciate the poetry? I stopped reading Joanna Trollope as her novels started to deteriorate and then I read one where she started the book with the word ‘Because’ – unpardonable sin. In my opinion her best were ‘The Choir’ and ‘A Village Affair’. If you are interested in reading Eliot, try ‘The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock’, which I think is his best and isn’t too long. ‘The Waste Land’ is very long.

    Liked by 1 person

    • thehomeplaceweb says:

      Thank you for your kind words. Robert Frost is an American poet so not likely you would know him. I don’t believe we have any famous Canadian poets – maybe Leonard Cohen who I never cared for, other than the Hallelujah song. I agree those famous poets were the rock stars of the day. Glad I’m not the only one disappointed in J. Trollope! I will check out Elliot.

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  5. fatdormouse says:

    Rather like Chomeuse, I smiled a little at your comment “the French seem to be perfectionists when it comes to clothing, which may be why they have such great personal style. ”
    Round here, personal style (and the myth that “Frenchwomen don’t get fat”) is something that hasn’t reached us out in the back of beyond. Most young women are of the jeans/T-shirt combo, and the older women mostly wear saggy, baggy skirts and overalls. Or jogging bottoms.
    I live my life in jeans, fleeces and pullovers mostly. I have some good jeans, for when I’m teaching, and some, er, let’s say “less good” jeans for when I’m not. A couple of smarter jumpers for work days – although I’m not working at the moment.

    Liked by 1 person

    • thehomeplaceweb says:

      Ah, so it must be a Paris myth! Thank you for the comment and the information. I have never been to France or Paris so I am ignorant of these matters, other than what I have read in books. Your wardrobe sounds much like mine, including my “less good jeans” – I hate shopping for jeans, and I’ve grown to dislike shopping period. I wish you well with your chemo sessions, and will send some prayers your way. Joan

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  6. avwalters says:

    I have never been a clothes horse. I remember when the recession hit in ’08, business reporters were bemoaning the hit taken by retailers in clothing. A study had revealed that, based on their closets, most consumers could go 7 years without buying clothing (socks and underwear excepted.) I’ve gone nearly that, easily. Indoors, I live in sweats. Outdoors I usually have up to 3 pairs of jeans (good, everyday and okay-to-paint-in.) In warmer weather, I wear white, long sleeve t shirts (limits sun exposure.) In winter, cotton turtlenecks and sweaters. Sweaters last forever. I don’t do fleece–not since I read an article about its environmental cost. I haven’t yet fully retired, but at this pace, I don’t expect to do my part supporting the economy and that’s okay with me.

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