The Subject Was Knock-Out Roses

The Knock-Out Roses are blooming again, starting into their second cycle of the summer.    While never as showy as the initial blooming, they are still a welcome sight, a bright spot of color among the withered baskets and dried up lawns of early August.   

Knock Out Roses

Knock OUt Roses 1 (2)         If you want a low maintenance, easy to grow rose then Knock-Out Roses are the rose of choice.   I have 24 of these rose bushes and it was one of the best garden investments I’ve ever made.   

roses and lavender

Knock Out Roses

At $20 per pot for the pink double ones I’ve had ten years of beauty from them.

Knock Out Roses

If you are not familiar with the family of Knock Out Roses they were created by rose breeder Bill Radler in 2000 and were a hit right from the start.  Traditionally roses have had the reputation of being finicky plants, hard to establish and prone to disease, requiring lots of tender loving care.   

Knock OUt Roses 2 (4)

Knock-Outs have become popular because they are basically no-care and disease resistant, but the biggest appeal for me was they are repeat bloomers.    After a glorious initial bloom in mid-late June here, they will repeat the blooming cycle every 5-6 weeks.   New growth on the bushes is seen as red shoots/leaves.   One year when we had a particularly late fall, I had roses up until December – they looked quite strange with a dusting of snow on them.      

snow on roses

Well more than a dusting….

They are also self-cleaning in the sense that there is no need to dead head them, although you can if you wish.  I spray mine with the garden hose on jet when they start to look too shaggy.   They are also heat tolerant and do well in most hot sunny locations, requiring 6-8 hours of sun a day.    The two I planted on either side of the house do not generally do as well as the others as they do not get enough sun, likewise several at the back which are in the shadow of the house. 

Knock Out Roses on Arbor

Made in the Shade

Although that is not true this year, as we have had horrible heat close to 100 for days, so the ones in the shade are doing better than the rest.   We also had a late cool rainy spring with little sun, so the bushes have failed to achieve their usual height.   I should point out that most of these pictures are from previous years, lest anyone think I have created miracles during this weird weather year.   

They also don’t need much water, so as they are the perfect plant-them-and-forget-them rose, especially important if you are a lazy gardener like me who hates to drag the hose around.   

Knock Out Roses

As tall as the shepherds hook

Pruning and height:   I prune mine back to about 12 inches in early spring, although last year I misjudged and pruned in late March then we had two more weeks of wintry cold, so I learned my lesson and waited this year.   If no pruning is done, they can reach 3 to 4 feet wide and 3 to 4 feet tall, and some years I have achieved this when we had a milder spring and a good growing season.   Although they may be shorter than usual this year due to our poor spring, they still have plenty of buds on them.     

Knock Out Roses

This year’s shorter bush

Caring and fertilizing:    I give them a dose of bone meal in spring and a sprinkle of controlled release fertilizer and that’s it.   The website suggests some winter protection in colder climates, but the year I blanketed them with a layer of fallen leaves, was also the year I noticed a lot of blackspot on the stems the following spring.  The nursery owner suggested I forego the leaf layer and spray them with horticultural oil to treat/prevent any fungal disease, which I do now every spring.    I do mulch them, but other than that they have survived our brutal Canadian winters, although this year I was a bit afraid as the stems were so late greening up and looked so dry and brittle for weeks, but they eventually came along….sigh of relief.    

Here’s the company’s website, with a page of FAQ’s – link.

There are ten colors.   I have the Double Pink Knock-Outs, as I love bright pink and when I bought the first lot the nursery owner suggested keeping the color the same if I wanted to make a statement.   The Double blooms are fuller and put on a nicer show, so I always recommend the doubles.  Unfortunately three of the Doubles I bought a few years later came out as singles, despite the silver grower tags on them stating double – liars!

I really wish they had climbers, but they only have shrub roses so far.   They do have a tree rose, which stands about 6 feet, but at $90 I found it hard to justify when I have so many others and being a small tree, I wondered how it would over-winter here? 

Knock Out Rose Tree

Knock Out Rose Tree

Of course there’s always a gardening mishap or two.   One year some unidentifiable slug (I was never able to capture one), started munching on the bushes on the west side of the yard and managed to steadily eat their way along the whole row.   I was busy with work and by the time I noticed it was too late – they had decimated six bushes.       

Knock Out Roses munched

2015 was not a good year!

Although I tried everything – soap, powder, washing them off with the hose – they continued their stealthy munch munch munch.    But the next spring they bounced back, good as new.   

Although they are bred to be disease resistant, a few years ago Rose Rosette Disease (also known as Witches Broom), started attacking the Knock Outs in some parts of the United States (see Southern Living article), but it hasn’t affected mine so far.   Knock on wood that it never moves this far north, but if does, then it’s game over and they all have to be dug up and discarded.    Best to check with your local nursery to see if this virus, spread by mites via wind, is a problem in your area before buying.     

While I do have other roses – an ancient climber, 

roses on trellis

with prolific blooms, 

Roses on trellis

This years abundant blooms.

and a ‘John Cabot’ climber, (also very short this year due to the difficult spring), the Knock-Outs remain my favorites.    

roses on arbor

So if you are looking for an easy care rose which will provide beauty all summer long, these are the roses to pick! 

Roses on Trellis

PS.   An old oil painting of my mothers.

Roses - AMc

Roses in a Vase

 

 

 

A Midsummer Garden Tour (The Color Purple)

           It must be a bad year for garden tours as I have not seen anything advertised and July is almost over.     We had a late spring, then it got very hot very suddenly.   We had too many days of over 40 C and very little rain and were fast approaching the crispy grass dried out part of summer where everyone but the most die-hard enthusiasts has given up, when the skies opened to a whole week of torrential downpours.   Now everything is green again but soggy.   Mother Nature is being temperamental this year, but at least we can go to the beach guilt free.  Watering Can

          It’s nice to go on garden tours to get inspiration and new ideas, plus it gives you a good excuse to wear a stylish hat, perhaps something with a broad brim and a navy grosgrain ribbon?   (I’m always in search of the perfect hat and sometimes the hats are more fun to look at than the flowers).   Two years ago, while on a garden tour I snapped a picture of this shady oasis of calm.   

purple garden bench            While purple and green are not colors that I would ever have thought of for a garden bench, the combination was eye-catching, and I believe the homeowner was ahead of the trend, or maybe I was two years behind as usual.   It wasn’t something I thought would work in my predominately pink garden, but I did steal their idea for the birdcage with the ivy flowing from it.  birdcage(Check Michael’s end of summer sale for birdcage bargains).   My ivy did not fare as well being exposed to too much sun, so this year I tried wave petunias which also did not do well either in the small space.    Maybe next year a fake ivy plant from the thrift store?   Would anyone notice?

       I noticed the purple and green theme back in the spring when the nurseries started carrying colored pots.    Purple looks particularly striking with pots of herbs, 

 

  and since then I have seen deep purple Adirondack chairs as well.  purple chair

       So onto my own little garden space.    I will spare you the bedraggled bits and concentrate on the things which looked lovely in June, the most popular time for garden tours.  

roses

          It was not a great year for the Knock-out roses as I pruned them the first of April and then we had two more weeks of winter, so lots of buds but not as much foliage and many dead branches.   For those unfamiliar, Knock-Out roses bloom all summer and are essentially maintenance free. 

         I have lots of pink roses in my garden and purple can be a great accent color for pink.   It can be a dark shade, as in these Jackmanii clematis vines next to the John Cabot climbing roses, purple clematis

trellis

or the purple Salvia, next to the pink Knock-Outs.     purple salvia       It can be a mixture of both dark and lighter shades as in this Purple Iris belonging to a neighbor.   I bought two clumps of this at the horticultural plant sale in May anticipating next spring.   Purple Iris Or it can be a pale lavender shade as in this Russian Sage, Russian sage and Rose of Sharon.   lavender rose of sharon      The Russian sage has been in for five years now and is thriving at over three feet tall.   It is drought resistant.  The Rose of Sharon, eight years old and covered with blooms every year, was another wise choice.     

          Then there are the mauve hydrangeas who can’t make up their mind if they are pink or blue, (wrong with the aluminum sulfate again). 

 

And of course we can’t forget the lilacs, the delight of every May. lilacs

          The majority of my lavender plants did not survive the winter so I had to replant, leaving me with a few spiky survivors.   This two year old French lavender plant in the back corner although not very full compared to my older English ones, blends in well with the pink wildflowers.   Lavender and bird bath                 Then there were the mistakes.   Not every shade of purple is attractive.  These foxglove seedlings from the farmer’s market came up a fuchsia color I did not care for at all as I was expecting a rosy pink. purple foxglove

And the Pink Champagne clematis I planted last year bloomed the same bright shade,  purple clematis lovely in it’s own way but clashing with the bubblegum pink of the rose bush beside it.   It’s unfortunate these two fuchsia friends could not be together but one is in the side yard and one at the back.    Some days I swear I will never buy anything again unless it is in flower and able to speak the truth.    

This year I planted multi-colored morning glories in front of this old recycled trellis…..twice.   They came up and then seemed to disappear. green cartI suspect the rabbits who lounge in my backyard in the evenings have been munching them for desert.   (They were upset because they couldn’t get at all those glorious carrots in the potager.  They have now moved on to sampling the petunias).carrots                        I was pleasantly surprised to see how much purple I actually have in my garden, but as every gardener knows there is always room for more and that neglected corner was telling me to buy a purple clematis to go with the lime green cart, and to think it all started with a garden tour…..

What great ideas have you discovered at a garden tour?