#Yellow and Purple – Wordless Wednesday

Yellow and purple are complimentary colors
Common in the first flowers of spring – like crocus
and Hyacinths
Which contrasts nicely with yellow daffodils
Cheerful pansies in bright
and pale shades
Violets sprinkled across the lawn
make the dandelions look sunny
Bright purple vinca stands out
And last but not least forsythia – the welcome sign of spring!

#March Madness – Wordless Wednesday

A photo recap of March.

First sign of spring – pussy willows for sale
Reading The Maid – a charming murder mystery with a maid turned sleuth – instead of spring cleaning!
Leftovers from the Mediterranean Diet
A March hare munching on the Mediterranean diet.
Lawn damage from the Merry Band of Moles who wintered under the front deck.
Anxiously awaiting those 80 bulbs I planted last fall. Note the piece of dryer lint the moles have scavenged for lining their nests so they can go forth and multiply….
Saw this magnificent spring garden painting by a local artist at a gallery opening.
A friend’s spring-like quilt – if it hadn’t already been spoken for I would have bought it….like I need another quilt….
This week’s excuse for not writing a blog post – that second dose was wicked.
This week’s excuse for not walking. It’s hard to find a spring jacket in a nice color. Plus there’s freezing rain forecast to send March out like a lion, which is kind of what that mustard color reminds me of….
Better to stay in and do a cozy puzzle….this one has it all…..fire, cat, dog, book, drink, snacks – what more could you want.
And for true March madness – imagine being shot in a lineup while buying bread. I remember reading the book The Cellist of Sarajevo. It’s sad and disturbing to see history repeating itself – prayers for Ukraine.

#Spring Thaw – Wordless Wednesday

Let your photo(s) tell your story.

Waiting for winter to leave….
A walk in the woods – blue skies and birch trees
Spring Thaw – 2005 – one of mom’s paintings
Not too much ice this year
Seven swans a swimming – six plus….
….one diva!
The Swans…..another painting
Seagulls in March
Waiting for spring to arrive….

#Spring Green – Wordless Wednesday

Let your photo(s) tell your story.

The chartreuse green of the first leaves…
A field of wheat planted last fall……
The grass greening, even if it does need cutting mid-April!
The rhubarb is early this year too….
Spring green goes well with any color….
like pink…
or red and yellow….
or blue……
or purple…..
or white…..
….or Sunshine in The Meadow. It’s Mother Nature’s perfect accent color!
But not this kind of white!
For that you need evergreen! Snow on April 21?

#Spring Fling – Wordless Wednesday

Let your photo(s) tell your story.

Spring Fling – March 2021 – by Joni’s mom
First sign of spring – which my neighbor weed whacked away!
Crocus in front of the library…
The early bloomers of the 50 bulbs I planted….looking rather downcast….
Blue skies smiling at me…..nothing but blue skies do I see!
The tulips stems seem short this year….
Hyacinths which have fallen over – we haven’t had enough rain….
Daffodils in front of the library…..you can tell they have a gardener.
It’s nice to hear the chorus of tree frogs when I walk….
Spring peeper hanging in there during the pandemic! Happy Spring!

March Madness

March has always been a crazy month – volatile, unpredictable, kind of like the stock market at the moment.   You can expect snow, sleet, rain, howling winds, warm breezes, sunny days, gray skies or all of the above.   Despite the Rodent and Company’s optimistic predictions for an early spring we have not had very many warm days and the few we did have were overcast.   In fact March came in like a lion with a big snowstorm, so hopefully it will go out like a lamb.  (It did not….3 C – 37 F today).

snow

Thankfully, the snow melted quickly, like the wicked witch of the west – revealing snow drops a few days later.

snow drops

I have a lovely view from my kitchen window as my neighbor has about ten clumps of them scattered around the base of an old tree, like a little fairy woodland.

The daffodil shoots were up the first week, growing by leaps and bounds. 

Our imaginations can leap forward to this vista of sunny yellow.

daffodils

On St. Patrick’s Day we had grocery shelves reminiscent of the great Potato Famine, 

empty shelves potatoes grocery store

but a spring rain changed the grass to Shamrock green overnight,

green grass

which was then covered up by more snow on March 23….ugh….

daffodils with snow

This is Spring?

The library might be closed due to COVID-19, 

Library closed

but the crocuses in front of it were open for business.

crocus in front of library

The robins were back,

Robin bird

and the tundra swans crossed the border early because our Prime Minister had ordered all international travelers home!

Tundra swans Lambton Shores

They winter in Chesapeake Bay and rest at the Thedford Bog, an Ontario marshland, before flying on to their breeding grounds in the Arctic. 

The March winds were brisk and perfect for kite flying.   There were rare sightings of children in the park trying this ancient activity, well their dad was trying.   They looked too young and seemed more interested in examining the ground as toddlers like to do, while the dad was busy untangling the string.    (No picture as he couldn’t get it airborne).

Airborne - kites - AMc

“Airborne” by Joni’s mom

I’ve never seen so many people out walking before, entire families have taken up the joy of exercise and their dogs are happy too.   I met Millie a Golden Retriever puppy who was ecstatic at being in The Great Outdoors, but at 12 weeks soon tired of walking and had to be carried home.  

We might be out of bread and soup,

but they will return, just like these old faithful perennials.

Dandelions

These dandelions need to practice social distancing….

On March 25, there was finally a day warm enough to sit on the front porch, sheltered from the wind, with a magazine and a mug of tea.   It’s so nice to feel the sun on your face after a long cold lonely winter (the Beatles).  

lawn chair and Victoria magazine

While the stores and restaurants may be closed and the grocery shelves empty, we can replenish our souls with nature and rejoice!   May the Gods of Spring place a pox on COVID-19!

PS.  As other people have observed, this crisis may be the Earth’s way of healing from all the climate change, by calling a time out – a message from Mother Nature.    

 

 

 

 

 

The Blue Garden

Although the white garden at Britain’s Sissinghurst Castle may be famous, I have always wanted a blue garden.   Although there is a certain romantic appeal to a vista of pale white flowers glowing in the moonlight, white simply does not make a statement to me.   I need color in my garden – pinks and purples and blues, perhaps a dash of yellow or red.    White is an accent color, seen only in a few daisies which came up from last years toss of a wildflower mix into a back corner.  My grandmother had a white snowball bush, and my mother had white spirea bushes along the front of the house – I cared for neither.  I did like the white apple blossoms on the crab-apple trees in our old orchard, tinged with a blush of pink and heady with fragrance, but their show was brief, one glorious week in spring.   No, it is color I crave and blue is my favorite color.   Although my garden is predominantly pink and purple (see last years The Color Purple and the upcoming Rose Cottage), my attempts at introducing blue into my garden have not been very successful.   Blue flowers may be a rarity in nature for a reason.

These are delphiniums from a Nova Scotia vacation so long ago that I’ve  forgotten the name of the small sleepy town where we stayed, other than there was nothing to do after supper so we toured the local botanical garden.  Certainly I was not into gardening back then, but the image of delphiniums against a picket fence was striking enough to warrant a picture, although my memory of the rest of the place is vague – I think there were roses past their prime? 

Delphiniums (2)

And this is my one solitary blue delphinium, which bloomed one year and was never seen again, nor were it’s pink and purple cousins.   The same thing happened with the lupines. 

blue delphinium

 A neighbor of my mother’s had a beautiful display of delphiniums a few years ago, five feet tall and waving look-at-me,  but he is a wonderful gardener.   I suppose I can’t expect a scene out of Downton Abbey, if I don’t put much effort into it. 

Then there was the blue rose, which came up a pale lavender/lilac at best.  What a marketing scheme that nursery tag was, a scrawny thing, it bloomed for a few seasons, producing exactly one rose every year.    I was so annoyed with it, that this year I tore it out when I was removing the dead Rose of Sharon beside it which hadn’t survived the winter.

Those pretty blue lobelia flowers in garden baskets look nice for a month or two at most, but do not survive the heat and neglect of July/August.    I’ve given up on them too.

blue flowers

I love the first sign of Siberian Squill in early spring, especially vibrant with the contrasting yellow of daffodils. 

Daffodils & Siberian Squill

There is a large swath of them growing wild along the river road and another neighbor has a lovely patch in her backyard, but I have never been able to find them in a nursery.    Maybe next year I will remember to ask if I can dig some up.  It’s another invasive species I wish would invade my back yard.    

Siberian Squill

Blue Hydrangeas are always lovely, but how many bags of aluminum sulfate have I bought trying to get them to go true blue.    I’ve had some some success with this bush near the side arbor, but only because the neighbor’s overhanging cedars make the ground naturally acidic.   Last year it was covered with blooms, this year there isn’t a single one and yet all the other bushes have plenty.   How do they decide which one is going to take a vacation?

hydrangeas

Last week I dumped some more AlSo4 on the rest, hoping all the forecast rain would wash it magically into the soil, and had some success.   At least they weren’t all lilac.   

blue hydrangeas

hydrangeas

blue hydrangeas

I had some luck with forget-me-nots this year, which a fellow gardener shared, somehow it hurts less when things don’t survive if they are free.    Of the donated bunches I planted last spring, one came up at the front of the house, and two small patches on the side bed.   This year I transplanted some more, hoping they will become invasive.   They reseed themselves once past blooming.

forget me nots blue

My Heavenly Blue morning glories are the good old dependables, except one year when they didn’t come up at all.    They are hardy souls and thrive on neglect once they get started, growing a foot a day in late summer.  I blogged about them here – link – A Glorious September Morning.

Morning Glory with bee

Blue Morning Glories

Blue Morning Glories

This year I planted them in front of two recycled trellises, hoping they will be more contained so I don’t have to spend three hours tearing them off the neighbor’s fences in the fall.   

Morning Glorious

Morning Glorious

I’m planning on checking out a blue clematis the next time I visit a nursery, but it must be blooming, so there are no surprises like the one I planted last fall which turned out a dark purple not the vibrant Jackmani I was expecting.    All future flowers must show their true colors before they are purchased!   

A few years ago a local garden tour brochure described one of the entries as the Blue Garden.    I was so excited to see it – and so disappointed to find there were no blue flowers at all, except blue planters, painted rocks and bits of blue ceramic garden kitsch.   I have a limited tolerance for most garden kitsch, no cutesy signs,  rusty iron figures or painted trolls are allowed on my castle grounds.    However I would like a cobalt blue garden cat to preside over my garden like Linda discovered at Walking Writing Wit and Whimsy.   It would provide the blue color I desire, a dose of whimsy and it wouldn’t need watering.   Forget the blue flowers, better to get a cat!  

Have I missed any blue flowers?  What is your favorite blue flower?